Tag Archives: Heritage Lottery Fund

Exploring ‘Gateways to the First World War’

ExploringGatewaysJan2015On Friday 16th January, over 50 of us gathered at the University of Kent to hear from the ‘Gateways’ team.

We heard from Dr Sam Carroll, Community Heritage Researcher, who introduced the Gateways centre, its aims* and how it can and has supported various community projects. For example, Dr Will Butler from the university’s School of History, shared his experience of working with the Simon Langton School in Canterbury; and Ernie Brennan from the National Children’s Football Alliance with Dr Emma Hanna talked about Gateways support of the Peace Fields Project.

We also heard from Dr Zoë Denness (Gateways team) and Jon Beer (School of History) about how University of Kent students and other volunteers could get involved in your project. Student Ruben Rees told us how he had volunteered at Canterbury Cathedral Archive and supported them in their First World War research.

We were also joined by: members from the Dover Museums & Arts Group (DMAG) who talked about their ‘Codename: Joined Up‘ First World War project; and from Blue Town Heritage Centre, the Royal Engineers Museum and Viola Films who described how they managed their joint ‘For the Fallen’ project.

Don’t forget, the Heritage Lottery Fund’s ‘Then & Now‘ funding strand is still open for applications.

*’Gateways to the First World War’ is a centre for public engagement with the First World War centenary funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). The aim of the Gateways team is to encourage and support public interest in the centenary of the First World War through a range of events and activities such as open days and study days, advice on access to materials and expertise, and signposting for other resources and forms of support.

Gateways can help you explore the following areas:

  • Memorials, commemoration and memory
  • Life on the Home and Fighting Fronts
  • The medical history of the First World War
  • Wartime propaganda and popular culture
  • Maritime and naval history
  • Operational and military history

Visit the Gateways website for more details

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Commemorate the WW1 centenary through music with The Last Post project

lastpostSuperact is recruiting community organisations across the UK to take part in The Last Post project this November.

Inspiring people of all ages to come together to explore their First World War heritage, The Last Post project gives communities the chance to remember the impact World War One had on their area and to play   music from the era as a mark of commemoration.

At every event around the country, the Last Post will be played in a variety of styles to remember someone in the community; not just on bugles but on any instrument from pianos and cellos to guitars and drums.

Last Post events this year will take place across the UK from 4th to 18th November 2014 as part of a ‘Last Post fortnight’.

To get involved and organise a Last Post event, community organisations and groups across the country can register for free now on The Last Post website to receive a toolkit, a WW1 songbook, training sessions and cash expenses to cover event costs.

Explaining the importance of the HLF support for the project, Carole Souter, Heritage Lottery Fund Chief Executive stated: “This nationwide project will reach out to new audiences for heritage and help local communities explore and understand their First World War stories in an imaginative way.”

Dr Emma Hanna, of the University of Greenwich, is the Historical Adviser for The Last Post project, providing historical information on the music and memory of the First World War. Dr Hanna is a member of the Gateways to the First World War public engagement centre based at the University of Kent. Gateways has also provided support for The Last Post’s training and information programme, and we are keen to talk to other groups about how we might be able to help with centenary projects. Please contact us at gateways@kent.ac.uk for more information or visit our website.

For more information about The Last Post project visit www.thelastpostproject.org.uk.

An update on the Football & Peace project

The National Children’s Football Alliance, based at Kings Hill, are leading the HLF-funded Football & Peace UK project for school children aged 11-14:

http://www.childrensfootballalliance.com/football-and-peace/

http://www.centenarynews.com/article?id=1130

http://www.hlf.org.uk/news/Pages/FirstWorldWarCentenaryOneYearToGo.aspx

The Football & Peace UK pilot project is inspired by the events of the Christmas Truce of 1914 and explores the role of sport during the First World War as reflected in the experiences of local people.

In January 2014, the Kent History & Library Centre & Maidstone Museum hosted Football & Peace First World war learning sessions for visiting school parties from:

  • High Weald Academy, Cranbrook
  • Swadelands School, Lenham
  • Herne Bay High School
  • Borden Grammar School, Sittingbourne
  • The Isle of Sheppey Academy, Minster

As part of the learning session at the KHLC, the students investigated our First World War local history resources in a range of formats and answered research questions.

Research themes included:

•         First World War Sport & Propaganda

•         First World War Sport & Recruitment

•         Taking a stand for Peace:

Exploring the stories of Conscientious Objectors in Kent

•         Marking the peace in Kent

•         Walter Tull- From Folkestone boy to First World War icon

The NCFA were filming for a project documentary during our January FWW learning sessions.

A key future date for Football & Peace project activity will be Friday 25th April 2014: ‘A Peace Day Celebration at the Gallagher Stadium, Maidstone United Football Club’.  The event is for Participating Schools, First World War Centenary Partners, Special Guests & the General Public.  Project work undertaken by school project participants will be displayed and recorded.  There will be a range of sport activities for school project participants, played in the spirit of the 1914 Christmas Truce.

(with thanks to Rob Illingworth, Service Development Librarian- Local History, KCC Libraries, Registration and Archives)

Successful networking at FWW in Kent & Medway update session

The Museum Development Programme for Kent & Medway held a successful First World War update session at the Royal Engineers Museum, Library & Archive on Monday 4th November.

The session was attended by over 50 people from various museums, heritage, and arts groups and organisations.  Speakers included the Shorncliffe Trust, the Western Front Association, the Kent Lieutenancy, the South East Grid for Learning Associates, the War Memorials Trust, Viola Films, the National Children’s Football Alliance, Kent County Council, Screen South, HLF and the Imperial War Museum.

It was a great opportunity to hear about the various plans and projects that are taking place in the county, and further afield – there is plenty going on and many ways for groups and organisations to get involved.

To see the notes of the session, click the link below.  Copies of the speaker’s presentations and other supporting information can be viewed below:

To keep in touch with others in Kent & Medway about the FWW, why not sign up to our GoogleGroup?

Don’t forget to sign up to the Imperial War Museum’s FWW Centenary Partnership Programme to gain access to a wealth of support and resources all free to use.

Screen South Successful in Lottery Bid

Kent in WW1- people, places and events in your county, a programme managed by Screen South, secures a Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) grant.

Screen South, a community focused creative media company, based in Folkestone Kent, has received a confirmed grant of £99,900 from the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) for the Kent in World War 1 (WW1) project, it was announced today. The projects aims to commemorate the people, places and events of Coastal Kent in WW1 with the creation of an interactive website bringing together and creating “one click” access to the heritage of the coastal communities of Kent in WW1.

The site will incorporate 15 micro- sites for locations around the coast enabling stories and material to be uploaded by contributors in each location, and ensuring that people find out about the impact of WW1 in their locality, plus events and activities in which they can participate.

A programme of community sharing events and school activities will enable people to take part and learn about the life of coastal communities in this period, whether sharing their memorabilia in pop-up exhibitions or adding to a flat map of their locality to show where actual people lived (both those who served in the forces and civilians). There will be opportunities for local heritage and community groups as well as interested volunteers to help develop and deliver the programme and website- making this a truly community project.

The Kent coast had a pivotal role in WW1, with the involvement of all three services (Army, Navy and Airforce). Kent saw major upheaval as the gateway through which men and material passed to the Western Front. The influx of men and women this produced, and the changes that occurred to every day civilian life as a consequence of the War, had a huge impact on the coastal towns and villages of coastal Kent which still resonates today. The project will bring together fragmented information into one common portal, providing access to all to the extraordinary history of the coastal communities and people in this period – bringing the past to life.

Jo Nolan, M.D. at Screen South, said: “Screen South is absolutely delighted that the Heritage Lottery Fund grant will enable us to lead this important community heritage initiative for WW1. We look forward to working with people from the coastal community in Kent and other partners on this project. Kent is home to some great stories and hidden gems, which by working together we will be able to uncover and share with a much wider audience- bringing the past within touching distance.”

About the Heritage Lottery Fund 

Using money raised through the National Lottery, the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) aims to make a lasting difference for heritage, people and communities across the UK and help build a resilient heritage economy. From museums, parks and historic places to archaeology, natural environment and cultural traditions, we invest in every part of our diverse heritage. HLF has supported almost 35,000 projects with more than £5.5bn across the UK.  www.hlf.org.uk.

About Screen South

Screen South is a Creative Development agency delivering and supporting innovative projects across screen-based media and the wider cultural and creative industries. They are a resource and broker that helps people get their ideas off the ground and supports delivery locally, nationally and internationally. Their overarching aim is to contribute to stimulating a competitive, successful and vibrant, creative industry and culture, and to promote its growth, enjoyment and understanding locally and internationally. Screen South is passionate about developing and contributing to a dynamic environment in which film and screen-based media culture can flourish. They are also the home of the Accentuate, the London 2012 legacy programme for the South East.

Screen South is a partner in the North Seas Screen Partnership, a European exchange with countries in the North Seas area including areas in Norway and Denmark, Belgium, Germany, Netherlands, Sweden and Scotland. Award Winning uScreen is also supported by the NSSP programme. www.screensouth.org

For further information, images and interviews, please contact:

Darrienne Price, Head of Business Support and WW1 Heritage darrienne.price@screensouth.org / 01303 259777